By Natasha Brown

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PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — The American Christmas Tree Association says more than three-quarters of American households put up a tree every year, but about 80 percent of those trees are artificial. This year, a $1 million campaign is trying to convince customers to buy the real deal.

The Christmas Tree Promotion Board’s $1 million social media campaign is fighting to preserve by encouraging Americans to “keep it real.”

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John Wyckoff, who owns a seventh generation, 170-acre farm, gives this response to those who buy artificial trees over the real deal.

“I wouldn’t give my wife fake roses on Valentine’s Day. Why would you want to have an artificial Christmas tree in your house?” he said.

Linvilla Orchards, in Media, Pennsylvania, is bustling with customers this time of the year, as families look to find the perfect tree to light up their homes and hearts this holiday season.

“We have about 30,000 thousand trees planted in the ground,” said Steve Linvill.

A real tree could cost you about $75, while an artificial tree can go anywhere between $9 and $19,000.

About 80 percent of U.S. households put up artificial trees.

“We’d like to have an artificial tree because I have allergies, so we’ve had them our whole life,” said Jodie Finn.

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Artificial tree companies, like Balsam Hill Holiday Shop in Cherry Hill, New Jersey, are also stepping up their marketing and tech game. Mac Harman created Balsam Hill in 2006 when he was disappointed with the fake tree options.

“One of the great things about it is it comes pre-lit, which is a huge advantage,” said Harman. “But, also, you don’t have to water it, you don’t have to sweep up the needles.”

A major factor for many is which tree is better for the environment. The American Christmas Tree Association says if you use your artificial tree for at least four years, it’s more eco-friendly than a real tree, but both account for less than .1 percent of the average person’s annual carbon footprint.