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PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — Speed-enforcement cameras in Pennsylvania is nearing passage in Harrisburg. It needs just one more vote, expected to take place in the fall.

If speed cameras come to Philadelphia, they would likely be operated by the city’s parking authority, which currently operates red light cameras.

And if speed cameras are anything like the red light cameras in Philadelphia, then thousands of violators could potentially bring the Philadelphia Parking Authority, or PPA, millions of dollars a year.

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That’s why Eyewitness News is revealing the five intersections considered red light camera “hot spots,” or intersections with the most red light camera violations.

The intersections with the most red light violations, according to the PPA’s Fiscal Year 2017 Report:

  • 2nd and Erie Streets near Franklinville
  • 9th St. and the Roosevelt Boulevard
  • Knights and Woodhaven Roads near Millbrook and Broad
  • And JFK in Center City.

Each of these intersections had between 3,062 and 3,939 red light violations.

The two intersections with the most red light runners caught on camera is at Island and Bartram Avenues near the Philadelphia International Airport, and Broad and Vine Streets, with 4,446 and 4,694 violations last year. Each also had a also a drop in violations since the cameras were first installed here a few years ago. Fiscal year 2015 saw 13,417 red light violations at Island and Bartram and 7,235 at Broad and Vine.

Eyewitness News found significant drop in violations at most other intersections in Philly just a few years after red light cameras have been installed.

PPA Executive Director Scott Petri says that’s the goal: To have drivers stop running red lights.

“Essentially, we’re trying to curb human behavior with red light cameras,” he said.

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Not yielding when the light is yellow at those intersections can really cost you. Red light violators caught on camera get a $100 ticket with no points. And we found red light cameras bring the Philadelphia Parking Authority a lot of green.

Fiscal year 2017 earned the PPA a net income of $10,541,496, according to its annual report. That’s more than double from the previous year, when the net income was $5,179,317.

Petri says the increase in revenue is in part because there’s been an increase in the number intersections equipped with red light cameras.

“Three new intersections came on board,” he said, adding, “There were some substantial savings as a result of bidding, as well… and the third reason was some efficiencies in bidding on the cameras and the camera cost.”

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Philadelphia has seen a growing number of intersections equipped with red light cameras since the cameras were first installed. For instance, in 2008, ten intersections had the cameras. Last year, there were 30 intersections equipped with a total of 134 cameras.

Still, Petri pointed out the cameras make dangerous intersections, like those along the Roosevelt Boulevard, safer, by helping to reduce the number of fatal crashes.

“For most people, a hundred dollar fine is a significant fine, and it changes their behavior pretty radically,” he said.