PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — David Limbaugh, a conservative columnist and author of the new book The Emmaus Code: Looking For Jesus in the Old Testament, reacted to the resignation of Tim Wolfe, the President of the University of Missouri, amid student protests and objections to institutional racism.

Limbaugh, talking with Chris Stigall on Talk Radio 1210 WPHT, blamed President Obama and his administration for setting the tone for these protests.

 

“I don’t deny there are problems at Mizzou. I don’t know the extent of them, but I think there is some outside influences. I think there’s a heavily charged politicization of race as a result of [President] Obama and [Former Attorney General Eric] Holder, his work. They try to agitate. Obama wants to community organize. This looks like community organization. I don’t think these incidents were more than isolated incidents, however abhorrent they were. It is not systemic racism and when you power down to these kind of false charges and make these kind of concessions, you’re setting a bad precedent because, now, this can happen, people can be held hostage all over the country.”

He accused activists at the school of over-blowing individual incidents to incite upheaval.

“Is this really what minorities want? Do they want a hostile, adverse environment in academia and with the cops, and everywhere else? Do white liberals want this? I just don’t believe that Mr. Wolfe was a racist. I’ve talked to people that are very good friends of his. I don’t know why he’s blamed for something that other people did that he had no control of. What’s he supposed to do? Have a fire drill at the school? I’m not being cynical. I’m just saying let’s not misdiagnose the problem and then apply false draconian solutions.”

Limbaugh said he believes most of the country is tired of being labelled a racist.

“I think there’s going to be a backlash and people are finally going to raise up. This political correctness, why do you think Trump and Ben Carson are doing so well? This nonsense has got to stop. The fact that I would say there isn’t institutional racism doesn’t make me racist. The fact that I talk counter to the common narrative going on doesn’t make me a racist. I’m so sick of the fact that we can’t say what we think. I guarantee you that a majority of Missourians, and probably Americans, agree with the position I’m taking to the extent that they even know what’s going on. It’s abhorrent. It’s worse than the original problem. We’ve got isolated of racism, minority on white, white on minority, all over the place. This is not systemic is this instance.”