Eye 3 Yellow 3d 2 new logo Philly_KYW_new Philly_94WIP_new CBS Sports Radio 610 Philly_WPHT_new
NOW LIVE: CBS News Special Report: President Obama Speaks On Ukraine, Healthcare: Watch Live Stream

Food & Drink

Roasted Lamb Recipe From “The Way We Ate”

November 4, 2013 6:00 AM

View Comments
(Photo credit: Simon and Schuster)

(Photo credit: Simon and Schuster)

Noah Fecks and Paul Wagtouicz are New York City-based photographers and writers who share a desire to re-create, cook, and capture some of the best recipes of the twentieth century. Visit their blog at www.thewayweate.net.

Redheaded, button-nosed food writer Melissa Clark is beloved by all who are privy to a flash of her megawatt smile. She earned an MFA in writing from Columbia University, and began a freelance food writing career in 1994. Since then, her work has garnered awards from the James Beard Foundation and the International Association of Culinary Professionals. She is a staff member of the New York Times, where she writes the popular Dining Section column “A Good Appetite.” In addition, Melissa has written thirty-three cookbooks, many in collaboration with some of New York’s most celebrated chefs.

An innovative work of history and a cookbook like no other, The Way We Ate captures the twentieth century through the food we’ve shared and prepared. For each year from 1901 to 2000, Noah Fecks and Paul Wagtouicz—creators of the hugely popular blog The Way We Ate—invite a well-known chef or food connoisseur to translate the essence or idea of a historical event into a beautifully realized dish or cocktail. The result is an eclectic array of modern takes and memorable classics, with original recipes conjured by culinary notables, including: Daniel Boulud, Jacques Pépin, Ruth Reichl, Marcus Samuelsson, Andrew Carmellini, Gael Greene, and many more. Below is a roasted lamb recipe, which is also perfect for Thanksgiving.

Related: Top Pumpkin Treats In Philadelphia

Roasted Leg Of Lamb With Mint Salsa Verde (1956)
Recipe by Melissa Clark

(Photo credit: Simon and Schuster)

(Photo credit: Noah Fecks and Paul Wagtouicz)


The hottest ticket on Broadway in 1956 was to My Fair Lady with Rex Harrison and Julie Andrews. It would go on to sweep the Tony Awards the following year, and was later adapted to film. Americans have long been fascinated by the charms and mysteries of class, society, manners, and all things British. We asked the lovely Melissa Clark to whip up a cheeky, elegant British dish that would surely please the newly refined Ms. Doolittle and appeal to us American Anglophiles as well.

Makes 6-8 Servings, Plus Leftovers

1 bone-in leg of lamb (6 to 7 ½ pounds), rinsed and patted dry
6 cloves garlic, chopped
2 tablespoons fresh thyme leaves
3/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon plus ½ teaspoon kosher salt
2 1/4 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper
½ cup finely chopped fresh parsley
½ cup finely chopped fresh mint
4 teaspoons finely chopped drained capers
Lemon wedges, for serving

Rub the lamb with two-thirds of the garlic, the thyme, and 1/4 cup olive oil. Season the meat with 1 tablespoon salt and 2 teaspoons pepper. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 2 hours or overnight. Remove the meat from the refrigerator at least 30 minutes before cooking. Preheat the oven to 400°F. Place the lamb in a large roasting pan. Roast 30 minutes; reduce the heat to 350°F and roast until medium-rare (140° to 145°F on an instant-read thermometer), 60 to 90 minutes more. Remove the lamb from the pan and rest for 10 to 15 minutes before carving.

While the lamb cooks, in a small bowl combine the parsley, mint, capers, and the remaining garlic, salt, and pepper. Stir in the remaining ½ cup oil.

To serve, transfer the sliced lamb to a large serving platter. Spoon the salsa verde over the meat; serve with lemon wedges.

Related: Ask A Philadelphia Stylist: Putting Together Your Top Fall Look

Noah Fecks and Paul Wagtouicz are New York City-based photographers and writers who share a desire to re-create, cook, and capture some of the best recipes of the twentieth century. Visit their blog at www.thewayweate.net.

Redheaded, button-nosed food writer Melissa Clark is beloved by all who are privy to a flash of her megawatt smile. She earned an MFA in writing from Columbia University, and began a freelance food writing career in 1994. Since then, her work has garnered awards from the James Beard Foundation and the International Association of Culinary Professionals. She is a staff member of the New York Times, where she writes the popular Dining Section column “A Good Appetite.” In addition, Melissa has written thirty-three cookbooks, many in collaboration with some of New York’s most celebrated chefs.

Copyright: From The Way We Ate: 100 Chefs Celebrate a Century at the American Table by Noah Fecks + Paul Wagtouicz. Copyright © 2013 by Noah Fecks + Paul Wagtouicz. Reprinted by permission of Touchstone, a division of Simon & Schuster.

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus