Regional Affairs Council — Dec. 2012

Stormproofing the Delaware Valley(Photo of Buck Road in Holland, Pa., by Paul Kurtz)

.Certain rivers and creeks flood after every heavy rain, yet nearby residents want to remain. The Jersey shore survives Hurricane Sandy, but can the next disaster be far behind?

And why is our infrastructure so vulnerable to Mother Nature’s whims?

KYW’s John McDevitt presents this four-part KYW Regional Affairs Council special report…

“Stormproofing the Delaware Valley”

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(A badly damaged home in Sea Isle City, NJ after Hurricane Sandy.  Credit: David Madden)

Part 1: Disasters of Our Own Making

Approximately 10,000 Philadelphia residents are living in flood zones. And that number is only within the city limits.

12/06/2012

(A crew from Mississippi Power Co. prepares to replace a broken power pole and install a new transformer following Hurricane Sandy.  Credit: Mark Abrams)

Part 2: Playing Catch-Up After Each Big Storm

When a storm hits, governments and utility companies often find their preparations insufficient.

12/06/2012

(The waters of the Schuylkill River rose during Hurricane Irene to flood Main Street in Manayunk wall to wall.   Photo provided by Michael Dornblum)

Part 3: Direct Damage and Other Costs

A major storm could cause a business to close its doors for good. But even those able to recover may suffer.

12/06/2012

(Storm waters surround a home in Lumberton, Burlington County, NJ following Hurricane Irene.  Credit: Karin Phillips)

Part 4: Finding A Better Way

Lessons learned from past storms have resulted in stricter building codes and other requirements on the federal, state, and local levels.

12/06/2012

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