Eagles

Santoliquito: Shut Up, DeSean

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(Photo credit: The Washington Post/Getty Images)

(Photo credit: The Washington Post/Getty Images)

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By Joseph Santoliquito

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — DeSean Jackson did many great things in the six years he played for the Eagles. His electrifying 65-yard, game-winning punt return against the Giants in 2010 is foremost and goes down as one of the greatest plays in Eagles’ history.

Although, his mercurial tenure will be debated like taffy pulled in opposite directions, with one end as arguably the most exciting player in franchise history and the other as a foot-stomping malcontent.

But right now, regardless of the unforgettable things he did in midnight green, Jackson should shut up.

The new member of the Washington Redskins stayed diligent when the topic of his former team and their fans was broached. Jackson had said all of the right things like putting the past behind, throwing his focus into his current team, how he still appreciates Eagles’ fans (his message only a few weeks ago at Shady McCoy’s charity basketball game), blah, blah, blah.

Then Jackson tells this to CSN Washington in contrasting Redskin fans to Eagles Fans: “It is different. They’re very supportive here. You know, they’re open. You know, being out here on the field I’ve been hearing certain things, but they’re good things. In Philly sometimes, things could have gotten a little negative. They booed their own players, but here you don’t really get that. They’re supporting you, they’re out there. Just as many people that’s here in the morning practice, came to our walk-through practice so that shows you something.”

“They really are big fans and they support us. And every time I come out here, guys are screaming things at me. That’s just a great fan base to really have.”

Jackson even took a veiled swipe at his former coach, Chip Kelly, saying, “I’m just happy to be with a good group of guys, a good coach, with Jay Gruden, Sean [Sean McVay, Redskins’ offensive coordinator], my receiver coach Ike [Hilliard], you know guys that are very familiar with the game. You know, not guys that just sit back and play X’s and O’s together. They really have a good take on this game.”

And the assumption is that an offensive maharishi like Kelly doesn’t?

The fact is Jackson should be grateful for every morsel of time he received in Philadelphia. The Eagles drafted him in the second round, after his stock plummeted coming out of California when numerous teams passed on him over his dubious discipline off the field. The Eagles then rewarded Jackson with a five-year, $48-million contract extension in March 2012—after he admitted that he didn’t give a full effort in 2011 because he didn’t want to risk injury before signing a new contract.

The fans here were appreciative of his talent, too, despite Jackson saying he bagged 2011. His former teammates and coaching staffs, both Andy Reid’s and Kelly’s, tolerated Jackson’s selfish antics.

He might have been booed a few times in 2011, his acknowledged “year off,” a confession that doesn’t play well anywhere let alone Philly, but Jackson was treasured enough by Eagles’ fans that they were outraged when the Eagles released him for nothing in return.

If Kelly is asked to respond to Jackson’s comments, he’ll no doubt take the high road, as he has throughout the Jackson drama. Kelly has moved on. Jackson hasn’t. But deep down, maybe behind closed doors, you have the feeling Kelly and a number of his former Eagle teammates will be whispering under their breath for “D-Jax” to shut the bleep up and realize the page has turned on his Eagles’ life!

Deep down you have the feeling that Jackson still harbors white-hot resentment over a parting in which he has only himself to blame.

 

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