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The Risk Of Sharing ‘Selfies’

(Photo Illustration by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

(Photo Illustration by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

feldman_amy Amy Feldman
Amy E. Feldman is a business commentator and legal business...
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By Amy E. Feldman

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) - A University of Georgia student filed a $2 million lawsuit last month against her high school school district, which she says, without authorization, took a photo of her in a bikini, and used it – along with her full name – in a seminar on Internet safety.

Someone’s getting a lesson in use of photos. That would be you.

Because while many are worried that someone will take an unauthorized photo of them and then post it, they don’t realize who is the most frequent culprit to post harmful photos. That would also be you.

Oxford Dictionary selected “selfie” – the act of taking a picture of oneself – as the word of the year last year, and with good reason. Teen Vogue reports that 91 percent of teens have posted selfies. (According to the article “When you get a GORGE you’re up”. Uh? Good?)

Forbes reports that 73 percent of recruiters check out social network posts, including LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter – even if the candidate does not supply them.

The bikini photo that the University of Georgia student sued about? Yep, she posted it on her Facebook page, and while she assumed it was private, she, like you, will learn a legal lesson the hard way.

Want to keep that memory private? Post the photo on an actual wall, not a virtual one.