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Health: New Tool To Detect Breast Cancer Arrives In Our Area

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stephanie-web Stephanie Stahl
Stephanie Stahl, CBS 3 and The CW Philly 57’s Emmy Award-win...
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By Stephanie Stahl

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) – New technology is making it easier for doctors to detect breast cancer. And a facility in South Jersey is among the first of ten in the country to make it available to patients. 3 On Your Side Health Reporter Stephanie Stahl has more on the new screening tool.

This may look like your typical mammogram, but the pictures it can provide are not the same.

“You always wonder ya know statistically are you going to be that one person that’s going to have cancer,” said Mary Campellone, of Mt. Laurel. She has dense breasts which makes it harder for doctors to spot cancer on standard mammography. She had a suspicious mammogram, so they recommended she get a new FDA approved SenoBright Mammogram at Cooper University’s Breast Imaging Center.

“It offered me peace of mind. The test was actually read while I was here,” said Mary.

This machine holds special contrast dye that’s injected into patients through an IV. Then patients get a standard mammogram.

“This is a technology that can identify abnormalities based on blood flow,” said Dr. Kristin Brill, Director of Breast Surgery with Cooper University Health Care.

The contrast dye lights up areas with increased blood flow that may be cancerous. Doctors say this can almost immediately eliminate patients who don’t need further testing, including biopsies.

“It may add to our ability to identify cancers particularly women who are difficult to image, that would be the younger, with dense breast tissue. Um it may give us some alternative to MRI,” said Dr. Brill.

For Mary, the new imaging told doctors she needed more testing, including a biopsy.

“Everything was benign, and I’m very, very happy about that. Big, big relief,” said Mary.

Doctors say the test is quick, about 15 minutes, and results are given to the patients at that visit, cutting the patient wait time from detection to diagnosis.

For more information on Cooper University’s Breast Imaging Center SenoBright, visit http://www.cooperhealth.org

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