More often than not, corn mazes are works of art specially designed every year with a new theme. These mazes often combine both education and entertainment, making them the perfect fall family destination. Just a short drive away from Philly, you can find multiple farms offering corn mazes and other autumn attractions including hay rides and pumpkin picking. So, before the corn is harvested for the season, head to one of these farms for a corn-mazing good time.

Cherry Crest Adventure Farm
150 Cherry Hill Road
Ronks, PA 17572
(717) 687-6843
www.cherrycrestfarm.com

Cherry Crest Adventure Farm is located in Lancaster County, a little more than an hour from Philadelphia. The five-acre corn maze’s theme this year is “Music Through The Decades,” and music will move you as you make your way through the maze. This interactive maze includes many clues to help you on your journey, as well as tunnel slides, scenic bridges and an after-dark special, the ‘flashlight maze.’ You can even choose your own difficultly: easy, intermediate or difficult. Cherry Crest’s corn maze season is one of the longest in the area: this creation opened in July and won’t close until November 8.

Hurricane Hill Farm
704 E. Reeceville Road
Coatesville, PA 19320
(484) 999-4600
www.hhfmaze.com

Established way back in 1897 in Coatesville, Hurricane Hill Farm is now run by its 4th generation. The five-acre corn maze has an African safari theme and you’ll find three games located within the maze to help you find your way out: Kernel Cobb’s Word Game, Cornelius Quest’s Picture Find and Poppie’s Secret Word Jumble. There is even a smaller maze for both young children and beginners alike. For those worried about getting lost, Hurricane Hill Farm now offers a tracking device to follow your progress using a smartphone. Just across the road, Hurricane Hill Farm also offers a haunted corn maze, haunted hay ride and haunted trail. The last day for the maze is November 3.

Snipes Farm
890 W. Bridge St.
Morrisville, PA 19067
(215) 295-1139
www.snipesfarm.org

Snipes Farm’s corn maze is five-acres and about 30 miles away from Philly. Great for groups, this corn maze strives to be both fun and educational. It requires people to work cooperatively to find their way out via clues and games hidden within the corn. This year’s theme is “Water, Water Everywhere.” Traveling through the maze after dark with a flashlight (bring your own – and extra batteries just in case you get lost) is an option on Friday and Saturday. The maze is open to the public on the weekends, but if you’re planning a trip with a group, you can make a reservation for a weekday. The corn maze is open until November 2.

Related: Top Spots For Apple Picking Near Philadelphia

Springdale Farms
1638 Springdale Road
Cherry Hill, NJ 08003
(856) 424-8674
www.springdalefarms.com

Just a short drive from the Delaware River in New Jersey lies Cherry Hill’s last working farm, Springdale Farms. As a fun fact, Cherry Hill had 82 farms in 1931. Springdale Farms came to be in 1949 when purchased by Alan Ebert, and the farm remains in the family. This year, Springdale Farms’ corn maze seeks to teach you about the settlers of the Wild West through clues, pictures and games, so expect to learn a thing or two while having a lot of fun in the process. The last day for the corn maze is November 2.

Wilcox Farms
1134 Reading Ave.
Boyertown, PA 19512
(610) 367-2387
www.wilcoxfamilyfarm.com

Just an hour away from Philly in Boyertown, Pennsylvania is the largest corn maze in the area. Wilcox Farms offers more than eight miles of trails and 25 acres of family fun. This huge corn maze (called “Pirate Bay”) is made up of many smaller mazes, so you’ll be able to choose how long you wish to explore. This year, the Wilcox Farms’ kids maze, in the shape of an alligator, is a one mile trail through four acres of corn. The last day for the corn maze is November 16. Flashlights are provided for after dark.

Related: Top Pick-Your-Own Pumpkin Patches

Kelly Neilson is a freelance writer living and working in Philadelphia. Her work can be found on Examiner.com.

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