By CBS3 Staff

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — Some Temple University students moved out of their dorm rooms Saturday after a spike in COVID-19 cases forced the college to revert to remote classes for the rest of the fall semester. Eyewitness News was on Temple’s Main Campus in North Philadelphia.

The college confirmed a total of 318 coronavirus cases, including one staff member who tested positive.

Students were seen packed up cars and moving back home on Saturday.

(Credit: CBS3)

“It’s kind of frustrating because I thought it was going to work out the first time but we only lasted a week,” Mikayla Capasso, a freshman from New Jersey, said. “It’s kind of a hassle to bring everything back home again, but it is what it is.”

“I’m confident that they’ll be able to possibly get this all under control and be able to move forward once the middle of January comes,” Koletta Weinberg, a parent of another student, said.

All classes will move from 75% virtual instruction and 25% in-person to 95% online and 5% on campus for the remainder of the fall semester.

“These are folks who must be present on campus to do something physically that can’t be simulated online. So for example a nursing student, physical therapy student, occupational therapy student,” Temple spokesperson Ray Betzner said.

Temple says there are academic and other support services available to students who remain on campus, including the health services.

For the 3,000 students remaining in residence halls, they have until Sunday, Sept. 13 to move out if they want a full refund on rent and meal plans.

“My parents want the refund so they’re like, ‘we’ll get you an apartment. I just want their money back,'” freshman Rayna George said.

“It’s like the disappointed but not surprised kinda feeling. I don’t know what Temple was really expecting by bringing us back,” sophomore Stephen Fiora said.

A Temple spokesperson says the school will continue to work with the health department on campaigns to help students better understand the gravity of COVID-19 so they can access their behavior to lower the risk for themselves and the surrounding community.

The university will decide if the spring semester will be entirely online or in-person.