By Llarisa Abreu

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) – For almost three decades, our community’s Mother’s Day celebration has started with Komen Philadelphia. Thousands dress in pink and take to the streets with one mission – to end breast cancer.

CBS3’s Llarisa Abreu sat down with four women whose lives have been deeply touched by the disease.

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This is the story of remarkable women whose love and support carried them through some of the darkest moments in their lives.

“It’s heartbreaking as much as it is rewarding, that I have two daughters that are survivors. They walk those steps with me,” Pat Greager said.

Meet Pat, Donna, Michele and Traci. Their bond goes beyond cancer. This local mother and her three daughters continue defying the odds.

“My adventure started when I was 55. I was diagnosed with ductal carcinoma after a lot of biopsy and papilloma and so forth,” Greager said.

For the last 20 years, Pat Greager has been walking with thousands of survivors each Mother’s Day during the Susan G. Komen Parade of Hope in Philadelphia. After beating breast cancer, she found hope and support within the Komen Community.

“We all go every year, all of our family and friends, we used to stand at the bottom of the steps,” Donna said.

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Little did Pat know, years later she’d be the backbone and the support for two of her three daughters, Michele and Donna.

“We would watch the parade of survivors walk down for all those years we’d stand there with thankful tears,” Michele said.

Donna added, “And cheer and clap, but I never imaged that we would be up at the top of the steps last year.”

COVID-19 has halted our daily lives and has shifted just about everything, including the Komen’s Mother’s Day Walk. So this year, Mother’s Day is going to be celebrated differently.

“We won’t be able to get together like we usually do on Mother’s Day but we can get together through ZOOM like we’re doing now. You’ve heard of Mimi’s Crew, and that’s my mom Mimi, and we’ll continue getting donations and helping with the cure, and awareness and promote,” Michele said.

Pat’s youngest daughter Traci is 55, about the same age as her older sister when she was diagnosed. She admitted she’s afraid but remains proactive because of her family’s history.

“I am diligent in getting my annual mammograms, and I am hoping that if the time comes, and I have an issue that that would keep me alive just like the rest of my family,” Traci said.

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