PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — We know at least one person who wants to replace Gabe Kapler as Phillies manager: Curt Schilling. USA Today’s Bob Nightengale reports the former Phillies pitcher would like to interview for the position.

“I think it’s one of the few openings since I left that I ‘fit,'” Schilling told USA Today Sports. “I know the city. I know the fans and I know the expectations.’’

Schilling is also reportedly interested in the Red Sox pitching coach position.

Over the summer, Schilling, a conservative firebrand who is a vocal supporter of President Donald Trump, told the Arizona Republic he is considering running for Congress.

“The state is not the state I grew up in. Making Arizona citizens of EVERY Race, religion and sexual orientation 2nd class citizens to illegal immigrants is about as anti-American as it gets,” Schilling told the Arizona Republic in a statement. “When you have homeless veterans, children, and you’re spending tax dollars on people smuggling drugs and children across our border someone in charge needs their ass kicked.”

The president backed Schilling at the time.

“Curt Schilling, a great pitcher and patriot, is considering a run for Congress in Arizona. Terrific!” Trump tweeted in August.

Schilling has had his share of controversy since his playing days ended. In 2016, ESPN fired the former pitcher over an anti-transgender Facebook post. The company also suspended him in 2015 for an anti-Muslim tweet.

He and others also agreed to pay $2.5 million to the state of Rhode Island in 2016 after allegations he defrauded the state of $75 million in loans related to his defunct video game business 38 Studios.

Over nine seasons with the Phillies, Schilling compiled a 101-78 record with a 3.35 ERA and was a three-time All-Star. He helped lead the Phillies to the National League Pennant in 1993 as he was named NLCS MVP.

Overall, during his 20 seasons in the league, Schilling won three World Series. He retired in 2007.

He fell short once again of reaching the Hall of Fame, only garnering 60.9% of the 75% of the vote needed for enshrinement. It was his seventh year on the ballot.