By Dan Koob


LANGHORNE, Pa. (CBS) — Thousands of United Automobile Workers remain off the job. Saturday marked Day 13 of the nationwide strike against General Motors. Officials were back at the bargaining table on Saturday after talks ended Friday night with no deal.

For nearly two weeks, United Automobile Workers have been on the picket line.

“It’s time we’ve been given a fair shake here,” Raina Shoemaker said.

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Over 70 local union members walked off their jobs at General Motors on Sept. 16 after they say healthcare had been cut and workers haven’t received a pay increase in over a decade.

“It’s very frustrating. It’s frustrating because we feel like the people at the top don’t care about us,” Shoemaker said. “It’s not getting any cheaper to live, but they want to keep taking and taking and taking from us workers.”

(Credit: CBS3)

“Me, myself getting up at 2:30 in the morning to be at work at 4, sometimes I work 4 to 4, just to make the money I should be getting on a basic salary,” James Mays Jr. said.

Workers on strike continue to ask for quality, affordable healthcare, job security and fair wages. Those on strike for almost two weeks say they have no plans on backing down either.

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“We’re doing what we have to do, we’re surviving. We’re going to do what we have to do to stay until the strike has ended,” Dave Greenhall said. “One day longer, one day stronger. That’s what we’re saying.”

Nearly 46,000 GM workers have been striking, affecting 55 sites in 10 states.

Talks between General Motors and the UWA reportedly continued on Saturday.

“They’ve been bailed out by the federal government,” Pennsylvania State Sen. Steve Santarsiero said. “They’ve received now a huge tax cut via Congress and the president almost two  years ago now and yet those benefits have not come back to working families.”

“We made you what you are, so you need to start treating us fairly,” Shoemaker said.