WORCESTER, Pa. (CBS) — For years, a Montgomery County woman has been spreading random acts of flowering. Trisha Gallagher’s car smells fresh as a rose — make that a lot of roses and daisies and more.

“My car always smells delightful,” she said.

Gallagher, who lives in Worcester, rescues flowers from plant purgatory. She got the idea six years ago, with her mom, Claire Mohan and friend Bob.

Credit: CBS3

“And somehow the thought came to me to approach grocery stores and ask if I could pick up their day-old flowers,” Gallagher said.

Some said yes, and the Happy Flower Day Project was born.

Several times a week, friendly (and anonymous) florists fill Gallagher’s car.

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“And then I just say, ‘God, where do you want these flowers to go to? Who needs them?'” Gallagher said. “And a thought will enter in my mind, like an AIDS hospice, a nursing home.”

On this day, they’re destined for Wesley Enhanced Living in Germantown. It’s one of her favorite drop-off spots.

“Annie, I met you the other day!” Gallagher said cheerfully.

She delivers the bundles of bouquets personally with a smile and a song, “Happy Flower Day to You,” to the old birthday tune.

“And I never give people just one,” Gallagher said.

Amy Vanbrug, director of therapeutic recreation, said she remembers the first time she met Gallagher.

“I’m walking down the hall and she’s like, ‘Hi, I’m Trish,’ and gave me a big hug!” Vanbrug said.

Gallagher makes sure the staff gets flowers too.

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“Take something home!” she said as she handed a bouquet of roses to one staffer.

“The wife will love you for that,” he said.

Gallagher’s mother passed away in 2014, but she kept the Happy Flower Day Project going. Her grandchildren sometimes help. She estimates she has given away 50,000 bouquets and plants.

Lois Landis said, “She’s always smiling and brings the happiness out of everybody.”

When Gallagher started six years ago, her car was brand new. Now it has 160,000 miles.

“I guess I’m addicted to it. I always say, ‘I’m going to stop. This doesn’t make sense, filling up my gas tank twice a week,'” she said, “but I keep on going. Keep on flowering.”

For more on the Happy Flower Project, click here.

Ukee Washington