By Howard Monroe


PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — Hurricane Dorian devastated the Bahamas. The Category 5 storm slammed the island nation for two days, with 185 mph winds and heavy rain. Bahamians living in Philadelphia are doing whatever they can to help their homeland.

It’s a grassroots effort for some to get relief to their home country. The group says everyone can do something to help people who have lost everything.

credit: CBS3

“This is about love, this is about the Bahamas, this is about the world, this is about paradise. But this is also about community and the global community as a whole,” Remy Duncombe says.

Duncombe is desperate to help his home country of the Bahamas as the island country is still under water after being hit by Dorian.

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“This is a catastrophe. This is a catastrophe and this is psychologically damaging,” he said.

The Red Cross says 13,000 homes were likely destroyed in the storm and drinking wells were likely contaminated with salt water.

Duncombe says he has family in the Bahamas that he hasn’t heard from in two days. He is asking anyone who can to help in any way they can.

“We need relief efforts, we need people to help,” Duncombe says.

To bring relief, Duncombe is working with the local group named Caribbean Community in Philadelphia. Among other things, they placed bins for relief supplies in the Chick-Fil-A on Cheltenham Avenue.

Bins are also placed elsewhere around Philadelphia. The group is looking for supplies like water as well as non-perishable food items.

Duncombe is also asking anyone who may have a jet ski or a boat, to go to the Bahamas to help those who are stranded.

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“We are one Caribbean, and in times such as this, we are reminded, how much we need each other, as a Commonwealth of Caribbean people,” Miranda Alexander, the founder of Caribbean Community in Philadelphia, said.

Also if you have any ideas or means of helping, Duncombe is asking for you to contact him directly at 267-581-2785.