By Stephanie Stahl


PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — Fighting cancer is a tough ordeal, but it got a little easier Monday at the Fox Chase Cancer Center, thanks to a special donation. When you talk about cancer, it’s usually about surgery, chemotherapy or radiation, along with the treatments which can be difficult. So small comforts, especially when they come from the heart, are welcome distractions.

There was a special delivery box at the Fox Chase Cancer Center, something soft for the hard realities of cancer — homemade neck pillows.

“I just wanted to do something to give back,” said Kat Kramer.

People Who Workout In Morning Lose More Weight, Study Finds

Kramer was treated here for breast cancer four years ago.

“It’s devastating, it’s hard, it wears away at your soul,” Kramer said. “When you’re going through chemo or radiation, you have support for your neck because you have to sit there for three or four hours, little something like the cushion makes you feel better.”

At Kramer’s side making the pillows, is her son Alex, who she taught to sew. As a little boy, he watched his mom battle cancer, and now at 13 years old, he’s learning a different life lesson of giving back.

“So other people can be happy and have hope,” Alex said.

Inside the infusion lab, 33-year-old breast cancer patient Bonnie Ettenger receives her neck pillow.

“In a very bad, uncomfortable, sad thing and when people want to pay it forward, it just makes you really happy,” Ettenger said.

Experimental Drug For OCD Could Give Patients Much-Needed New Treatment Option

This was a double dose of happiness for Ettenger, as she received her 27th and last dose of chemo and had the chance to meet Kramer.

Fox Chase Cancer Center says the pillows will be distributed throughout the hospital.

“We are just grateful for the generosity,” Helen Gordon, of the Fox Chase Cancer Center, said.

Homemade comforts are easing the difficulties of cancer treatment.

Most Americans Unaware Of Second Most Common Cancer In Nation, Survey Says

“I get emotional because I know what it’s like, I went through two lumpectomies and radiation and I know what it’s like to be here day after day,” Kramer said. “If I could do just one little thing to make it that much more comfortable and bring them hope, then I’m there, I’m happy.”

There were lots of hugs at Fox Chase and there is no doubt that many patients there are a little more comfortable with those pillows next to them.

Stephanie Stahl