PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — A stunning report says more young people than ever before are trying to kill themselves using poison. Suicide is now the second-leading cause of death for people between the ages of 10 to 24. The majority are girls and young women.

Teenage years can be complicated and filled with all kinds of pressure. A new study published in the Journal of Pediatrics says the number of teenage suicides by self-poisoning has soared over the past 19 years, especially among girls.

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“Girls and women are more likely to attempt suicide. Boys and men are more likely to complete suicide,” psychologist Lisa Damour said.

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That’s because females tend to use drugs to try to end their lives, as opposed to guns, which are more lethal. The research covered 19 years of data collected from 55 poison centers across the country.

From 2011 to 2018, for teenagers overall, there was a 141% increase in attempted suicides by poisoning. Among girls ages 10 to 12, there was an astounding 338% increase.

A young woman, who wants to remain anonymous, survived a suicide attempt and says she still struggles with depression.

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“I have my days, but I try not to allow my mind to trick me into saying that it’s not gonna get better, because it can and it will,” she said.

Experts say teenage suicide is influenced by social media, cyber-bullying and isolation.

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“Depression is an illness in the same way pneumonia is an illness, as we can treat pneumonia, we can treat depression,” Damour said.

Treatments for depression include medication and therapy, but to have effective treatment, it has to be diagnosed, which can be tricky with teenagers. Experts say it’s critically important for parents to talk to their kids and keep an open mind looking for any signs of mental health trouble.

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Wednesday starts the beginning of Mental Health Awareness Month.

Stephanie Stahl