By Greg Argos


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PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — John Dougherty, known by most as “Johnny Doc,” is one of the most influential labor leaders in Philadelphia. He’s been the business manager for International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 98 for more than two decades. Bobby Henon is a powerful member of the Philadelphia City Council.

On Wednesday, both men shared the fact that they’ve been federally indicted by the U.S. government in a years-long embezzlement, bribery and theft investigation.

“The bottom line is that this indictment alleges that John Dougherty and his co-defendants used Local 98 funds as their own,” First Assistant U.S. Attorney Jennifer Arbittier Williams said.

Union Leader John Dougherty, Philadelphia City Councilman Bobby Henon Indicted Following Federal Probe

Court documents show Dougherty and the other named Local 98 members used union funds to buy themselves and others everything from big screen TVs to baby food.

“Ultimately costing the union and its members over $600,000,” Williams said.

And it’s all outlined in a 160-page indictment, all 116 counts, including some against Henon.

You Can Read The Full 116-Count Indictment Here 

Besides the outlined illegal spending, are more sinister allegations, showing Dougherty used Councilman Henon to help him get the city to bend to his will.

At one point, feds alleged Henon stopped work at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia because it was a non-union site, after Dougherty asked him to.

“In essence, the indictment alleges Henon abdicated his duty to provide honest services to the citizens of Philadelphia, because he made decision on behalf of John Dougherty, rather than the people who elected him to city council,” Williams said.

City Leaders Don’t Expect Councilman Bobby Henon To Be Removed From Office Following Federal Indictment Involving IBEW Local 98 Members

Some of his constituents in the Sixth District, which includes Mayfair, were buzzing about the bombshell indictment.

“I think they should get to the bottom of it before he resigns or anyone comes to a conclusion,” one woman said.

“It’s not a crime to help somebody and say, ‘OK, you helped me do this, I’ll help you do that.’ As long as it’s on the up and up,” one man said.

But the feds say there was nothing legal about what Henon, Dougherty and six other IBEW employees did.

And so the federal case charges forward.

In statements, both men maintained their innocence.