By Stephanie Stahl
By Stephanie Stahl

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) – There’s hope for families struggling with cancer, not from doctors and medicine, but from an organization that provides financial and emotional support.

Health reporter Stephanie Stahl is here with more on their milestone.

Surviving cancer usually depends on medicine but for the patients and their families, there’s also everyday life, and many burdens. That’s where this charity comes in to help.

Bringing Hope Home has reached the milestone of helping 3,000 families struggling with cancer.

“We pay household necessities on the financial side, rent, mortgages, utility, car payment, food, whatever else they need, and on the emotional side we let them know they’re not alone,” said Paul Isenberg, CEO and founder of Bringing Hope Home. “We let them know there are people out there who care about them,” he says.

Kelly Wills’ husband Tom died last year after being diagnosed with advanced tongue cancer at the age of 43.

“We couldn’t have got through it without them,” said Wills, who lives in Warminster.

Kelly says Bringing Hope Home did everything from pay bills to getting Christmas presents for the kids.

“They came in at a time when we really, really needed them and they helped us with so many things,” she said. “Tom and I were both so grateful. It was amazing.”

Paul Isenberg started the organization when his first wife was diagnosed with cancer when she was nine months pregnant. He knows the turmoil and heartache cancer brings to families.

“I don’t want anyone to have to go through anything that we went through alone. We can bring some hope to your home,” he said. “We can let you know that your not by yourself.”

Nicole survived for six years, but died, leaving Paul behind with two small children. He eventually re-married, and now Miriam has also been diagnosed with cancer.

“God doesn’t give you anything you can’t handle. I just wish he didn’t have so much faith in us sometimes,” Paul said.

Bringing Hope Home helps families who have a loved one in active cancer treatment in the Philadelphia region. They have a variety of fundraisers to support the mission.

Kelly says Joe Cowhey, with the Shoprite in Warminster, was kind enough to have a fundraiser at the store for BHH in Tom’s honor, happening in the upcoming months.

It’s a check out charity where the cashiers will ask customers at the checkout if they would like to donate a dollar for Bringing Hope Home. A date for the fundraiser hasn’t been set. To learn more about the organization, go to www.bringinghopehome.org .

Stephanie Stahl