By Syma Chowdhry

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — A rally is underway at the National Constitution Center to celebrate the Supreme Court ruling on same-sex marriage.

It is an historic day especially here in Philadelphia.

That’s because the first major U.S. protest for LGBT equality took place in front of Independence Hall back in 1965.

There’s a saying “after every storm comes a rainbow” and activists say the fight for equality was just that.

Same-sex marriage supporters are elated about the Supreme Court’s ruling.

“Marriage is about love between two people.”

Shelley Fabrizio says, “I’m so delighted that same sex marriage will be recognized all over the country it’s fantastic.”

Same sex marriage became legal in our local states over the past few years, but this ruling means couples in our area will be recognized across the country.

Kevin Freese says, “If we get married and we travel, there is not a big question that just by stepping over a state line, protections that are in place for us here in Pennsylvania are not in other states.”

The LGBT movement has historical roots in Philadelphia.

There were many gay rights demonstrations in the late 1960’s in and around Independence Hall.

“This is a photo of me getting arrested.”

Mark Segal is the publisher of the Philadelphia Gay News and he has been fighting for equality for decades.

“This is a happy face today.”

He fights back tears talking about all the rights same sex couples will now have.

“One-thousand of those rights all across the board, states, cities and federal laws they are now on par with one simple word: the word is equality.”

But not everyone is celebrating the ruling.

Daniel Watson says, “Them being together, they love each other, that’s okay, but marriage is a man and woman.”

Nick Cazer adds, “I don’t think it is a basic human right for man to sin against their creator and I think the Supreme Court ruling goes against what He has said is supporting sin.”

The Philadelphia Archdiocese agrees.

Archbishop Charles Chaput released this statement saying in part:

“…..The mistakes of the court change nothing about the nature of men and women, and the truth of God’s Word.”

Segal says, “It affects everybody and it affects nobody. It doesn’t affect any church anywhere in America, but it affects every gay, lesbian person in America.”

The National Constitution Center has an exhibit on the history of gay rights and officials had to make last minute additions with today’s ruling.