By Pat Loeb

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — NBC’s chief medical correspondent, Dr. Nancy Snyderman, has an association with the University of Pennsylvania but she won’t be flying back here to spend her 21 days in quarantine after a member of her camera crew in Liberia tested positive for Ebola.

Snyderman is an alumna of Penn’s School of Medicine, and holds an appointment as a “clinical associate” of otorhinolaryngology, which means she’s a resource to Penn doctors who do head and neck surgery but doesn’t see patients.

She lives in San Francisco, which is likely where she’ll self-quarantine, which means limiting contact with others inside the home and watching for symptoms.

That’s different from “isolation,” when people who actually have the disease are put in special units for treatment.

NBC was not releasing specific details.  They say they’re focused on getting their people out safely.  Snyderman has said she’s confident she isn’t infected.

Mark Ross, of the Hospital and Health System Association of Pennsylvania, says the region is prepared in the event an Ebola case should show up here.

“Our hospitals are prepared to deal with infectious diseases,” he notes.  “They have isolation protocols, they have personal protective equipment for the staff.  They have routine infection control practices that, according to CDC, will work for Ebola.”

Ross says local hospitals stay up on all the latest guidance for identification and treatment of ebola.