Curiosity Rover Lands On Mars

NASA Curiosity Rover Uses ChemCam
NASA Curiosity Rover Uses ChemCam
IN SPACE - AUGUST 19: In this photo provided by NASA/JPL-Caltech, this composite image, with magnified insets, shows the first laser test by the Chemistry and Camera, or ChemCam, on NASA's Curiosity Mars rover on August 19, 2012 on Mars. The ChemCam fires a laser at a rock to analyze the plasma that comes off the rock in order to identify its chemical elements. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech via Getty Images)
NASA's Curiosity Rover Images Of Mars
NASA's Curiosity Rover Images Of Mars
ON MARS - AUGUST 8: In this photo provided by NASA, a view of the lower reaches of Mount Sharp is shown in a cropped image taken with a 34-millimeter Mast Camera on NASA's Curiosity rover on August 18, 2012 on Mars. It is likely that Curiosity will begin to begin its ascent at Mount Sharp through hundreds of feet (meters) of layered deposits. The lower several hundred feet (meters) show evidence of bearing hydrated minerals, based on orbiter observations. The terrain Curiosity will explore is marked by hills, buttes, mesas and canyons on the scale of one-to-three story buildings, very much like the Four Corners region of the western United States. This image shows the colors modified as if the scene were transported to Earth and illuminated by terrestrial sunlight. This processing, called "white balancing," is useful to scientists for recognizing and distinguishing rocks by color in more familiar lighting. (Credit: NASA via Getty Images)
NASA's Curiosity Rover Images Of Mars
NASA's Curiosity Rover Images Of Mars
ON MARS - AUGUST 8: In this photo provided by NASA, a set of marks on the surface of Mars is shown in a cropped image taken with a 34-millimeter Mast Camera on NASA's Curiosity rover on August 18, 2012 on Mars.The set of marks show where blasts from the descent-stage rocket engines blew away some of the surface material. This particular scour mark is near the rear left wheel of the rover and is the left-most scour mark on the left side of this larger panorama from Curiosity's Mast Camera. This scour mark is named Goulburn after a 2-billion year-old sequence of rocks in northern Canada. (Credit: NASA via Getty Images)
NASA Releases Curiosity Rover Images
NASA Releases Curiosity Rover Images
ON MARS - AUGUST 8: In this handout from NASA, a mosaic image from NASA's Curiosity rover Mast Camera shows the first target that the rover will use its Chemistry and Camera (ChemCam) on August 8, 2012 on Mars. The ChemCam will fire a laser at the rock and analyze the plasma that comes off the rock to identify its chemical elements. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS/LANL via Getty Images)
Miguel San Martin
Miguel San Martin
Argentinian Miguel San Martin, Principal Engineer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), poses for a picture in NASA's JPL in Passadena on August 15,2012.Miguel San Martin is the co-chief of the team that designed the landing of NASA's Curiosity rover on Mars.The rover landed successfully on the Red Planet on August 6 at 05H31 GMT. (Credit: JOE KLAMAR/AFP/GettyImages)
NASA's Curiosity Rover Captures Mars
NASA's Curiosity Rover Captures Mars
ON MARS - AUGUST 9: In this handout image provided by NASA and released on August 9, 2012, a color image from NASA's Curiosity Rover shows the pebble-covered surface of Mars. This is a portion of the first color 360-degree panorama from NASA's Curiosity rover, made up of thumbnails, which are small copies of higher-resolution images. The mission's destination, a mountain at the center of Gale Crater called Mount Sharp, can be seen in the distance, to the left, beginning to rise up. The mountain's summit will be imaged later. Blast marks from the rover's descent stage are in the foreground. (Credit: NASA/Getty Images)
NASA's Curiosity Rover Captures Mars
NASA's Curiosity Rover Captures Mars
IN SPACE - AUGUST 8: In this handout image provided by NASA and released on August 8, 2012, a color full-resolution image shows the heat shield of NASA's Curiosity rover and was obtained during descent to the surface of Mars on August 5. The image was obtained by the Mars Descent Imager instrument known as MARDI and shows the 15-foot (4.5-meter) diameter heat shield when it was about 50 feet (16 meters) from the spacecraft. This image shows the inside surface of the heat shield, with its protective multi-layered insulation. The bright patches are calibration targets for MARDI. Also seen in this image is the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing Instrument (MEDLI) hardware attached to the inside surface. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS via Getty Images)
NASA's Curiosity Rover Captures Mars
NASA's Curiosity Rover Captures Mars
ON MARS - AUGUST 8: In this handout image provided by NASA and released on August 8, 2012, a 3-D view in front of NASA's Curiosity rover, which landed on Mars on August 5, is captured. The anaglyph was made from a stereo pair of Hazard-Avoidance Cameras on the front of the rover. Mount Sharp, a peak that is about 5.5 miles (3.4 miles) high, is visible rising above the terrain, though in one "eye" a box on the rover holding the drill bits obscures the view. This image was captured by Hazard-Avoidance cameras on the front of the rover at full resolution shortly after the rover landed. It has been linearized to remove the distorted appearance that results from its fisheye lens. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech via Getty Images)
NASA's Curiosity Rover Captures Mars
NASA's Curiosity Rover Captures Mars
ON MARS - AUGUST 8: In this handout image provided by NASA and released on August 8, 2012, a 3-D view behind NASA's Curiosity rover, which landed on Mars on August 5, is captured. The anaglyph was made from a stereo pair of Hazard-Avoidance Cameras on the rear of the rover. Part of the rim of the Gale Crater, which is a feature the size of Connecticut and Rhode Island combined, stretches from the top middle to the top right of the image. One of the rover's wheels can be seen at bottom right. The bright spot is saturation from the sun. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech via Getty Images)
NASA's Curiosity Rover Captures Mars
NASA's Curiosity Rover Captures Mars
IN SPACE - AUGUST 8: In this handout image provided by NASA and released on August 8, 2012, are the first two full-resolution images of the Martian surface from the Navigation cameras on NASA's Curiosity rover, which are located on the rover's "head" or mast. The rim of Gale Crater can be seen in the distance beyond the pebbly ground. The topography of the rim is very mountainous due to erosion. The ground seen in the middle shows low-relief scarps and plains. The foreground shows two distinct zones of excavation likely carved out by blasts from the rover's descent stage thrusters. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltechvia Getty Images)
NASA's Curiosity Rover Captures Mars
NASA's Curiosity Rover Captures Mars
IN SPACE - AUGUST 8: In this handout image provided by NASA and released on August 8, 2012, a full-resolution color image from NASA's Curiosity Rover shows the pebble-covered surface of Mars. It was taken by the Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) several minutes after Curiosity touched down. The camera is about 30 inches (70 centimeters) from the surface as the rover sits on the ground. The image pixel scale is about 0.02 inches (0.5 millimeters), but the camera is slightly out of focus at this distance, so the actual ground scale is about 0.06 inches (1.5 millimeters). A sliver of sunlight passing through the structure of the rover illuminates the surface. The largest rock fragment in the image is about 2 inches (5 centimeters) long. Most are much smaller. A rover wheel is visible at the top left. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS via Getty Images)
Mars Rover Curiosity
Mars Rover Curiosity
Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission director Jennifer Trosper speaks at a press conference at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, on August 6, 2012. NASA opened a new chapter in the history of interplanetary exploration when its $2.5 billion nuclear-powered robot Curiosity beamed back pictures from the surface of Mars. (Credit: ROBYN BECK/AFP/GettyImages)
Mars Rover Curiosity
Mars Rover Curiosity
An image of the Mars Rover Curiosity gliding on its parachute as it descends to the surface of Mars is shown at a press conference by Michael Malin (C), Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) principal investigator Jennifer Trosper (L), Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission director, and Joy Crisp, MSL deputy project, on August 6, 2012 at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. The image of Curiosity descending on its parachute was taken by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). NASA opened a new chapter in the history of interplanetary exploration when its $2.5 billion nuclear-powered robot Curiosity beamed back pictures from the surface of Mars. (Credit: ROBYN BECK/AFP/GettyImages)
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab Holds Viewing Of Mars Curiosity Rover Landing
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab Holds Viewing Of Mars Curiosity Rover Landing
IN SPACE - AUGUST 5: In this handout image provided byNASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona, NASA's Curiosity rover and its parachute are seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter as Curiosity descends to the surface of Mars August 5, 2012. The MSL Rover named Curiosity is equipped with a nuclear-powered lab capable of vaporizing rocks and ingesting soil, measuring habitability, and whether Mars ever had an environment able to support small life forms called microbe. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona via Getty Images)
Full Size Engineered Model of the Mars Rover Curiosity
Full Size Engineered Model of the Mars Rover Curiosity
Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) engineers James Wong (L) and Errin Dalshaug (R) examine a full size engineered model of the Mars rover Curiosity at JPL in Pasadena, California August 2, 2012. NASA said Thursday all was well ahead of its nail-biting mission to Mars, with its most advanced robotic rover poised to hunt for clues about past life and water on Earth's nearest planetary neighbor. On a two-year journey to seek out signs of environments that once sustained life, the landing of the Mars Science Laboratory and the largest and most sophisticated rover ever built, Curiosity, is set for 1:31 am August 6 (0531 GMT). (Credit: ROBYN BECK/AFP/GettyImages)
Control Room at Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Control Room at Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Telecom Engineer Ryan Mukai works in the Control Room at Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California August 2, 2012 as he prepares for the landing of the Mars rover Curiosity. NASA said Thursday all was well ahead of its nail-biting mission to Mars, with its most advanced robotic rover poised to hunt for clues about past life and water on Earth's nearest planetary neighbor. On a two-year journey to seek out signs of environments that once sustained life, the landing of the Mars Science Laboratory and the largest and most sophisticated rover ever built, Curiosity, is set for 1:31 am August 6 (0531 GMT). (Credit: ROBYN BECK/AFP/GettyImages)
Mission Control
Mission Control
Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Lead Flight Director David Oh speaks to members of the media in the Mission Control room ahead of the landing of the Mars rover Curiosity, at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, August 2, 2012. NASA said Thursday all was well ahead of its nail-biting mission to Mars, with its most advanced robotic rover poised to hunt for clues about past life and water on Earth's nearest planetary neighbor. On a two-year journey to seek out signs of environments that once sustained life, the landing of the Mars Science Laboratory and the largest and most sophisticated rover ever built, Curiosity, is set for 1:31 am August 6 (0531 GMT). (Credit: ROBYN BECK/AFP/GettyImages)
(Credit: ROBYN BECK/AFP/GettyImages)
Data Processing Room (Credit: ROBYN BECK/AFP/GettyImages)
Data Processing Room
Data Processing Room
Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission members work in the data processing room beside Mission Control at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California August 2, 2012 ahead of the landing of the Mars rover Curiosity. NASA said Thursday all was well ahead of its nail-biting mission to Mars, with its most advanced robotic rover poised to hunt for clues about past life and water on Earth's nearest planetary neighbor. On a two-year journey to seek out signs of environments that once sustained life, the landing of the Mars Science Laboratory and the largest and most sophisticated rover ever built, Curiosity, is set for 1:31 am August 6 (0531 GMT). (Credit: ROBYN BECK/AFP/GettyImages)
Press Conference Before Scheduled Landing
Press Conference Before Scheduled Landing
NASA Associate Administrator John Grunsfeld speaks at a press conference before the scheduled landing later tonight of the Mars Rover Curiosity on August 5, 2012 at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. Once Curiosity is lowered by a Sky Crane onto the surface of Mars it will be the first time a rover lands on the Red Planet wheels first, rather than enveloped in airbags. (Credit: ROBYN BECK/AFP/GettyImages)
Press Conference Before Scheduled Landing
Press Conference Before Scheduled Landing
NASA Associate Administrator John Grunsfeld (L) and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Director Charles Elachi hold a press conference before the scheduled landing later tonight of the Mars Rover Curiosity on August 5, 2012 at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. Once Curiosity is lowered by a Sky Crane onto the surface of Mars it will be the first time a rover lands on the Red Planet wheels first, rather than enveloped in airbags. (Credit: ROBYN BECK/AFP/GettyImages)
Mars Science Laboratory Mission Support Area
Mars Science Laboratory Mission Support Area
White House Science and Technology Advisor John Holdren, second from left, stopped by the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mission Support Area to meet the landing team and to say "Go Curiosity" as NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, left, NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory Director Charles Elachi, right look on, Sunday, Aug. 5, 2012 at JPL in Pasadena, Calif. The MSL Rover named Curiosity was designed to assess whether Mars ever had an environment able to support small life forms called microbes. Curiosity is due to land on Mars at 10:31 p.m. PDT on Aug. 5, 2012 (1:31 a.m. EDT on Aug. 6, 2012). (Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls/Getty Images)
NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) team clap and welcome White House Science and Technology Advisor John Holdren, third standing from left, as he stopped by to meet the landing team and to say "Go Curiosity" as NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, send from left, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory Director Charles Elachi, left look on, Sunday, Aug. 5, 2012 at JPL in Pasadena, Calif. The MSL Rover named Curiosity was designed to assess whether Mars ever had an environment able to support small life forms called microbes. Curiosity is due to land on Mars at 10:31 p.m. PDT on Aug. 5, 2012 (1:31 a.m. EDT on Aug. 6, 2012). (Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls/Getty Images)
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab Holds Viewing Of Mars Curiosity Rover Landing
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab Holds Viewing Of Mars Curiosity Rover Landing
Pasadena, CA, United States: Sunday, August 5, 2012 - Propulsion engineers Todd Barber and Raymond Baker, right, works before landing inside the Spaceflight Operations Facility for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, USA on Sunday, August 5, 2012. The Curiosity robot is equipped with a nuclear-powered lab capable of vaporizing rocks and ingesting soil, measuring habitability, and potentially paving the way for human exploration. (Credit: Brian van der Brug/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images)
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab Holds Viewing Of Mars Curiosity Rover Landing
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab Holds Viewing Of Mars Curiosity Rover Landing
Pasadena, CA, United States: Sunday, August 5, 2012 - Attitude Control system engineer Martin Greco, left, and Activity lead Bobak Ferdowsi, who cuts his hair differently for each mission, works inside the Spaceflight Operations Facility for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, USA on Sunday, August 5, 2012. The Curiosity robot is equipped with a nuclear-powered lab capable of vaporizing rocks and ingesting soil, measuring habitability, and potentially paving the way for human exploration. (Credit: Brian van der Brug/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images)
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab Holds Viewing Of Mars Curiosity Rover Landing
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab Holds Viewing Of Mars Curiosity Rover Landing
Pasadena, CA, United States: Sunday, August 5, 2012 - NASA inside the Spaceflight Operations Facility for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, USA on Sunday, August 5, 2012. The Curiosity robot is equipped with a nuclear-powered lab capable of vaporizing rocks and ingesting soil, measuring habitability, and potentially paving the way for human exploration. (Credit: Brian van der Brug/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images)
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab Holds Viewing Of Mars Curiosity Rover Landing
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab Holds Viewing Of Mars Curiosity Rover Landing
Pasadena, CA, United States: Sunday, August 5, 2012 - NASA celebrate a successful landing inside the Spaceflight Operations Facility for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, USA on Sunday, August 5, 2012. The Curiosity robot is equipped with a nuclear-powered lab capable of vaporizing rocks and ingesting soil, measuring habitability, and potentially paving the way for human exploration. (Credit: Brian van der Brug/Los Angeles Times-POOL/Getty Images)
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab Holds Viewing Of Mars Curiosity Rover Landing
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab Holds Viewing Of Mars Curiosity Rover Landing
Pasadena, CA, United States: Sunday, August 5, 2012 -NASA celebrate a successful landing inside the Spaceflight Operations Facility for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, USA on Sunday, August 5, 2012. The Curiosity robot is equipped with a nuclear-powered lab capable of vaporizing rocks and ingesting soil, measuring habitability, and potentially paving the way for human exploration. (Credit: Brian van der Brug/Los Angeles Times-POOL/Getty Images)
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab Holds Viewing Of Mars Curiosity Rover Landing
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab Holds Viewing Of Mars Curiosity Rover Landing
Pasadena, CA, United States: Sunday, August 5, 2012 - NASA celebrate a successful landing inside the Spaceflight Operations Facility for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, USA on Sunday, August 5, 2012. The Curiosity robot is equipped with a nuclear-powered lab capable of vaporizing rocks and ingesting soil, measuring habitability, and potentially paving the way for human exploration. (Credit: Brian van der Brug/Los Angeles Times-POOL/Getty Images)
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab Holds Viewing Of Mars Curiosity Rover Landing
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab Holds Viewing Of Mars Curiosity Rover Landing
Pasadena, CA, United States: Sunday, August 5, 2012 - NASA celebrate a successful landing inside the Spaceflight Operations Facility for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, USA on Sunday, August 5, 2012. The Curiosity robot is equipped with a nuclear-powered lab capable of vaporizing rocks and ingesting soil, measuring habitability, and potentially paving the way for human exploration. (Credit: Brian van der Brug/Los Angeles Times-POOL/ Getty Images)
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab Holds Viewing Of Mars Curiosity Rover Landing
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab Holds Viewing Of Mars Curiosity Rover Landing
Pasadena, CA, United States: Sunday, August 5, 2012 NASA celebrates as the first pictures appear on screen after a successful landing inside the Spaceflight Operations Facility for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, USA on Sunday, August 5, 2012. The Curiosity robot is equipped with a nuclear-powered lab capable of vaporizing rocks and ingesting soil, measuring habitability, and potentially paving the way for human exploration. (Credit: Brian van der Brug/Los Angeles Times-POOL/Getty Images)
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab Holds Viewing Of Mars Curiosity Rover Landing
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab Holds Viewing Of Mars Curiosity Rover Landing
(From L) John Grunsfeld, NASA associate administrator, Richard Cook, MSL deputy project manager, Pete Theisinger, MSL project manager, Adam Steltzner, MSL entry, descent and landing (EDL) lead and John Grotzinger, MSL project scientist from the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity Rover mission team raise their arms at a press conference after the Mars Rover Curiosity successfully landed on the surface of the Red Planet on August 5, 2012 at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. NASA's 2.5 billion USD Mars rover on August 5 sent back its first signals to mission control as it was about to enter the Red Planet's atmosphere in the final moments of a dramatic touchdown. (Credit: ROBYN BECK/AFP/GettyImages)
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab Holds Viewing Of Mars Curiosity Rover Landing
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab Holds Viewing Of Mars Curiosity Rover Landing
IN SPACE - AUGUST 5: In this handout image provided by NASA/JPL-Caltech, one of the first images taken by NASA's Curiosity rover, which landed on Mars on the evening of August 5, 2012 PDT and transmitted to Spaceflight Operations Facility for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California. The MSL Rover named Curiosity is equipped with a nuclear-powered lab capable of vaporizing rocks and ingesting soil, measuring habitability, and whether Mars ever had an environment able to support small life forms called microbe. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech via Getty Images)
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab Holds Viewing Of Mars Curiosity Rover Landing
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab Holds Viewing Of Mars Curiosity Rover Landing
IN SPACE - AUGUST 5: In this handout image provided by NASA/JPL-Caltech, one of the first images taken by NASA's Curiosity rover, which landed on Mars on the evening of August 5, 2012 PDT and transmitted to Spaceflight Operations Facility for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California. The MSL Rover named Curiosity is equipped with a nuclear-powered lab capable of vaporizing rocks and ingesting soil, measuring habitability, and whether Mars ever had an environment able to support small life forms called microbe. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech via Getty Images)
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab Holds Viewing Of Mars Curiosity Rover Landing
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab Holds Viewing Of Mars Curiosity Rover Landing
IN SPACE - AUGUST 5: In this handout image provided by NASA/JPL-Caltech, one of the first images taken by NASA's Curiosity rover, which landed on Mars on the evening of August 5, 2012 PDT and transmitted to Spaceflight Operations Facility for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California. The MSL Rover named Curiosity is equipped with a nuclear-powered lab capable of vaporizing rocks and ingesting soil, measuring habitability, and whether Mars ever had an environment able to support small life forms called microbe. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech via Getty Images)
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab Holds Viewing Of Mars Curiosity Rover Landing
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab Holds Viewing Of Mars Curiosity Rover Landing
IN SPACE - AUGUST 5: In this handout image provided by NASA/JPL-Caltech, one of the first images taken by NASA's Curiosity rover, which landed on Mars on the evening of August 5, 2012 PDT and transmitted to Spaceflight Operations Facility for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California. The MSL Rover named Curiosity is equipped with a nuclear-powered lab capable of vaporizing rocks and ingesting soil, measuring habitability, and whether Mars ever had an environment able to support small life forms called microbe. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech via Getty Images)
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab Holds Viewing Of Mars Curiosity Rover Landing
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab Holds Viewing Of Mars Curiosity Rover Landing
Christopher J. Scolese, Director of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, left, congratulates, MSL Entry, Descent and Landing Engineer Adam Steltzner as they look at the first images of Mars to come from the Curiosity rover shortly after it landed on Mars, Sunday, Aug. 5, 2012 at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Curiosity was designed to assess whether Mars ever had an environment able to support small life forms called microbes. (Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls/Getty Images)
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