Study: 54 Percent Of Dog Owners Willing To End Relationship If Pup Doesn’t Like Partner

PHILADELPHIA (CBS)—A new study has revealed that the majority of American dog owners are willing to end their relationship if their dog doesn’t like their partner.

The study, “The Truth About Dog People,” was conducted by Rover.com and examined thousands of dog owners’ responses from 2015 to 2017.

Data shows that the human-dog relationship has evolved from one of ownership to one based on kinship.

In the study, Rover.com says 54 percent of pet parents were willing to end a relationship if their dog didn’t like their partner.

“Young Americans are less likely to be homeowners or parents than previous generations, but one category they lead in, is pet ownership. They shower their dogs with attention and splurge on expensive gifts because their dog is their best friend, and they want to be their dog’s best friend too,” said Brandie Gonzales, pet lifestyle expert for Rover. “Dog people are deeply concerned about their dog’s feelings and well-being. And we’re seeing that reflected in everything from how people name their dog to what they feed them, and the type of pet care they prefer.”

Danielle Adinolfi, a marriage and family therapist, says break up by dog is more and more common.

“People rely on their dogs for judgments of character and whether or not they’ll be a good fit,” she says.

Adinolfi says before a relationship gets too serious it’s important to have conversations about money, sex and yes-
Fido.

“The same way you would if you’re going into a relationship and you know for sure if you do or don’t want to have kids, this should be the same conversation.”

Researchers also found one in four pet parents have brought their pet on a date. Sixty-five percent of those pet parents also admitted that they take more photos of their dog than their significant other.

Leaving the house is just as bad for these owners.

One in three owners have shed a tear when leaving their dog at home. About 47 percent of pet owners said they find it harder to leave their dog for a week with their human partner. Ouch!

And when you come home, don’t expect a “hello” first.

Rover.com says 56 percent of dog people say hello to their dog first when they come home, before greeting the rest of the family.

To learn more about the study CLICK HERE.

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