Breast Cancer Survivors Share What Race For The Cure Means To Them

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — Thousands of breast cancer survivors walked in the 2016 Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure on Sunday. Many of them talked about their battles and shared what the race meant to them.

“Every year I say I’m not going to cry coming down the steps but I cried like a baby,” said Gloria, a six-year cancer survivor. “I  miss those that have gone on before me but those that walk today are blessed.”

“Regardless of your color, we are sisters. This is a sorority you don’t want to be in but once you’re in… you’re in for life,” Gloria explained.

 

“It’s very emotional,” said Michelle who recently finished up radiation treatments after being diagnosed with stage I breast cancer in September. “My family is all with me here today—I couldn’t get through it without them.”

Carol Erickson, a cancer survivor herself talked to other survivors on the steps of the art museum.

“This is my 6th year but my first year as a survivor,” noted a woman decked out head-to-toe in pink. She explained that she used to walk with her sister before she sadly lost her battle. “I’m here to tell a story and help other people.”

Back near the tents a mom and two-time cancer survivor explained her shock when she was first diagnosed.

“Early detection—I should be the poster child. To hear those words at [age 35]… I couldn’t believe it,” she said.

“I just stayed very strong and very positive. I told my sons ‘mommy’s tough and that I’m a fighter.'”

Mimi is another woman who was diagnosed at an early age with triple negative breast cancer just this past January. She’s currently in the middle of chemo treatments.

“I see the survivors and I know I’m going to be one of them real soon.”

 

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