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Storms Bring Flooding, Damage To Delaware Valley

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(credit: Jamie Rau)

(credit: Jamie Rau)

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PHILADELPHIA (CBS) – Storms moved through the Delaware Valley on Friday, bringing flooding and damage to our region.

In New Jersey, there have been reports of flooding down the shore, in Cape May County.

In Delaware, flooding and down trees have been reported in Kent and Sussex counties, closing multiple roadways.

Mother Nature unleashed massive amounts of rain on Dover, turning parking lots into lakes, roads into rivers. Stranded drivers were forced to abandon vehicles. The water was just too high.

“They were stalled here and all around Dover,” said Kevin Blanchett. “A lot of people they drive and they don’t realize it’s raining and water is flooded.”

Dover, Del. flooding. (credit: Jamie Rau)

Dover, Del. flooding. (credit: Jamie Rau)

 

“It’s like a monsoon outside,” said Scott Young. “I’ve been in the Philippines a number of times. It looked like a monsoon the way the rain was coming down.”

For some, the rain was a headache. Jason Malago came home to a flooded basement.

“The water was about an inch, in certain spots probably a little bit deeper,” said Malago. 

He spent hours Friday trying to clean up. He lived in Dover all his life and says this is the worst flooding he’s ever seen.

“It’s definitely still coming in from the ground and cinder block walls. So it sweats and it just keeps coming. I’m going to try to keep up with it all night. Pretty much all I can do,” he said.

Homeowners are concerned about the threat of more rain this weekend.

(credit: Jamie Rau)

(credit: Jamie Rau)

Motorists are urged to drive with caution.

“When encountering a road that is covered in water, motorists should not drive through the water, because the road might be damaged under the water,” said Jim Westhoff, Delaware Department of Transportation spokesperson.  “If motorists come upon a traffic signal that is not working, they should come to a complete stop and treat the intersection like a four-way stop.”

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