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Too Much Of A Good Thing

(credit:  Phran Novelli)

(credit: Phran Novelli)

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By Phran Novelli

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) - They’re pretty and prolific and they can easily get out of control.

If you have morning glories growing in or around your garden you know what I mean. At my house, beautiful blue morning glories literally grow like weeds – they came with the house, I never planted them. To keep them somewhat under control, I pull out most of them before they go to seed, which is where next year’s supply comes from.

While some gardeners find morning glories hard to start, here’s a glimpse at how tough they can be to stop. Last week, I pulled a pile of their vines and dumped them in a bin to dry for a few days before getting rid of them – three days later morning glories that had been yanked out of the ground by their roots were still blooming.

A lot of plants can do that: summon their last bit of strength to push their flowers into producing seeds for next year’s weeds. And that’s a great reason why you don’t want to leave flowering weeds lying around in your garden after you pull them, because if they can, they’ll just breed more weed seeds.

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