Doctor Outlines Costs Of Contraception For Those Without Health Insurance

By Michelle Durham

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) – The controversy over contraception being included in health insurance brings an interesting question to the forefront: How much does birth control really cost?

For Thomas Jefferson University Hospital OB GYN Dr. Katie Lackritz, this is a conversation she has with her patients every day and she says cost is the real decisive factor.

“Some of the best birth control we have are the I.U.D’s (intra uterine devices. ) To purchase the device and have it placed in the office if you have no insurance, over $1,000. The Mirena I.U.D. which is another great form of birth control, to purchase the device and have it placed in the office $1100. That is a ton of money.”

Lackritz says the price of the prescription limits often limits what a healthcare provider can prescribe.

“Some of the newer birth control pills can be expensive without insurance coverage — $50, $60, $75 a month and they are the ones that have been more researched and are better tolerated.”

Lackritz says bottom line, in her experience, those without insurance have fewer options or can’t afford to take the birth control properly and that results in unplanned pregnancies, which she says has a high cost too.


More from Michelle Durham
  • NJRN2012

    Actually there are several pills at the walmart/target lists for $9/month. When I didn’t have insurance I used it for a year until I found full-time employment. I didn’t get pregnant during that time so they must work. People just don’t want to use it or don’t know to use those lists.

    • grim reaper

      Abortion and zygote/blastula termination are genocide.

      • ep tor

        Condoms are inhumane sperm traps that are the leading cause of genocidal deaths of future potental human beings. Vote for Pope Santorum and save humanity.

  • Robert Betts

    What a joke. Not even a mention that their are other well tolerated options generic of birth control for under $20 per month. This report goes straight to the most expensive options.

    If $20/month is such a burden, women of child bearing age would be giving up their smartphones.

  • More BS

    The med ia s lu t/De m op erative could’ve gotten the pill for $9 a month, not 3 grand a year

  • KennethTSmiley

    Many existing laws and regulations apply specifically to pregnant women. Several provisions of the Affordable Care Act offer new benefits for expecting mothers. Search online for “Penny Health” if you need affordable insurance for yourself or your wife.

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