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Candidates Fight To Remain On Philadelphia Primary Election Ballots

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(Mayoral candidate Milton Street outside the Philadelphia Board of Elections office on Friday.  Photo by Steve Tawa)

(Mayoral candidate Milton Street outside the Philadelphia Board of Elections office on Friday. Photo by Steve Tawa)

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PHILADELPHIA (CBS) - Today was “Try To Kick Your Opponent Off The Ballot” Day in Philadelphia.

There were oral arguments held  before a Philadelphia judge on whether two City Council members, a city commissioner, and a mayoral candidate were eligible to remain on their respective ballots.

Lawyers for Philadelphia mayor Michael Nutter argued that primary challenger Milton Street did not qualify as a mayoral candidate because he has not lived in Philadelphia for the three years prior to the general election, as required by law.  They say he was either in a federal prison in Kentucky or living in Moorestown, NJ during most of that period.

But Street says he’s been registered to vote in Philadelphia for years, and lives here.

“All of my correspondence is through Philadelphia,” says the onetime Pennsylvania legislator who later did time
for tax evasion.

“How many nights a week are you staying at that address?” a reporter asked.

“Eight,” Street replied with a laugh. “If I’m not at that address, without permission, then I’m in violation of parole.”

Nutter’s people also argue that Street doesn’t have enough valid petition signatures. That portion of the argument will resume on Monday.

Also, political opponents of Philadelphia City Council members Frank Rizzo (related story), Marian Tasco (related story), and city commissioner Marge Tartaglione (related story) are trying to force them off the May primary ballot because of their participation in the “DROP” pension program.  Judge James Lynn promised a decision “in due course.” The losing side is expected to appeal to Pennsylvania Commonwealth Court.

Reported by Steve Tawa, KYW Newsradio 1060.

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