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Plan To Require Bicycle License Plates In NJ Goes Nowhere

NEWARK, NJ (CBS) — One day after a plan was introduced in New Jersey to put license plates on bicycles (see previous story), the legislator behind the idea has decided to pull it.

Newark assemblywoman Cleopatra Tucker had originally indicated she wanted to put the $10 plates on bikes in part because senior citizens complained to her about bike-riding kids, some of whom would try to knock them down.

Those without the plates could have been fined $100.

Sources indicate she was told by legislative leadership that the bill would not even be assigned to a committee, prompting Tucker to pull the bill.

In a printed statement, Tucker said she never intended to “impose a burden or additional costs.” S he insists the rowdy kids are still a problem and while, as she put it, “no idea is perfect,” she hopes she has at least started a discussion on how to better protect elders.

Reported by David Madden, KYW Newsradio 1060.

  • Oleg

    Vote Cleopatra Tucker out.

  • Michael

    This happens in various states every once in a while. Lawmakers quickly realize that it’s unworkable because they can’t set the fee high enough for it to even pay for the administration cost (without it seeming unreasonably high to the average person who buys a $100 department store bike). But it’s a misguided notion in the first place. It’s a FACT that someone who bicycles (and doesn’t drive at all) actually subsidizes people who drive, if you compare the relative wear and tear on roads with how much each person contributes to road construction and maintenance. Roads are not paid for fully by motorists – user fees (like gas tax) account for only a fraction of the total costs of road construction and maintenance. Most streets (except State and Federal Highways, which make up only a small fraction of our roads) are funded primarily through property tax and other sources that aren’t user fees.

  • Juan Garcia

    She should have stayed the course. The plates could have generated much needed revenue. The rich bike riders can easily afford a small fee. this could have been based in income. the old and the children need all they can get in these times.

  • mike romano

    I think it should be 20 bux a year plus, use of bike trails should require additional registration fees as well as all hikers must pay a fee too just like fisherman and hunters do, the proceeds should go to fixing our parks and aquirring more land, why is it ONLY FISHING/HUNTING LICENCES ARE REQUIRED YET HIKERS USING SAME AREAS PAY NOTHING? IVE SEEN PLENTY OF HIKERS LITTER OUR PARKS AS WELL AS CYCLISTS THEY SHOULD PAY FEES LIKE EVERYONE ELSE…

  • ZZBar

    she never intended to “impose a burden or additional costs.” Then what is $10 and a $100 fine? Vote this nut-case out of office soon.

  • kate

    unreal that someone would actually come up with such an idea

  • getalife

    Assemblywoman Cleopatra Tucker it is those stupid laws and lawyers thinking up more stupid laws that is wrong with this country. The old forget that they too were once young.

  • KCR

    Glad this one was shot down. Not because it is a bad idea, but because it would be impossible to enforce, and waste more tax dollars. I suggest more bicycle lanes to keep the cyclists separate from pedestrians and cars.

  • joe

    How much time, effort and cost was incurred in this assinine legislation. Jersey politicians got to love them

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